Tuesday, November 17, 2015

More travelers, bad weather, and airline glitches could serve up the most
chaotic holiday travel season in years.
(Photo: Thinkstock)The leaves are
falling, temperatures are dropping, and Starbucks is serving coffee in red
cups."All signs point to the fact that the holiday season is almost upon
us.
But unfortunately, traveling this holiday season is likely to bring more
chaos than cheer."More people than ever are due to travel for the holidays
this year.
The holiday season of 2014 saw 98.6 million Americans traveling,
and that number is expected rise this year.
In addition, lower gas prices mean
Thanksgiving travelers should be ready to face more congestion on the
highways.Airlines For America, the leading U.S.
airlines trade organization,
is projecting that 25.3 million people will travel globally on American
airlines over the 12-day Thanksgiving period — the most travelers since
before the recession began in 2008, and a 3% increase over last year."Related:
Insiders Say Egypt Crash Could Happen HereThat is an average of 2.1 million
people taking to the skies per day, an increase of 65,000 daily compared to
2014."The roads will be just as busy."A recent study by the Federal Highway
Administration and the U.S.
Department of Transportation revealed that the
nation"s mileage has been climbing month on month for the past 18 months,
surpassing 2 trillion miles for the year by August 2015."According to new
figures released from AAA, 46.9 million Americans "will journey 50 miles or
more from home during the Thanksgiving holiday, a 0.6 percent increase over
the 46.6 million people who traveled last year and the most since 2007,"
marking the seventh consecutive year of growth for Thanksgiving travel."WATCH:
5 Airplane Hacks You"ve Never Heard Of (That Actually Work) Much of this
increase in travel — both by road and air — is likely due to the
consistent drop in fuel prices, making it much cheaper to get around."Of
course, more people traveling means more congestion and longer lines, both on
the road and at the airport."Adding to the chaos is the weather.
We are set to
have one of the worst winters, weather-wise, on record.
A new report by the
National Oceanic Atmospheric Association (NOAA) says that the El Nino weather
pattern is still strengthening, and is likely to last until early spring in
2016.""Outlooks generally favor below-average temperatures and above-median
precipitation across the southern tier of the United States and above-average
temperatures and below-median precipitation over the northern tier of the
United States" the report explains."These weather patterns have the potential
to cause serious problems for people"s travel plans.Related: Passengers Keep
Getting Kicked Off Planes—What if it Happens to You?"It looks like with
the strong El Niño, we are more likely to stay in a wet, stormy,
low-visibility type of pattern across our Southern states," explains
meteorologist Mike Bettes, host of "Weather Underground" on The Weather
Channel.
"I would anticipate lots of rain, visibility issues that could cause
huge problems at airports.
Visibility is always a huge issue at airports
because it slows everything down."Visibility issues effect the road conditions
for drivers, too.""Some major Southern interstates, I-10, I-20 in the South,
then the I-95, I-85, I-75 in the Southeast, where we have a lot of car travel,
all have the potential to be problematic," Bettes says." The unpredictable
weather patterns caused by El" Niño will cause major problems on the
roads and in the air.
(Photo: Thinkstock)He recommends keeping a close eye on
the weather forecast in the run up to your holiday trip, and adjusting your
travel plans accordingly."We"re going to face more flight cancellations and
delays because of El Niño," said Daniel Farrar, CEO of travel technology
company Switchfly.
"And for travelers, El Niño will also mean some pretty
bumpy landings, takeoffs, and midflight turbulence."
Related: The Ultimate
Guide to Booking Holiday TravelAnd now for the third wrench in the whole
holiday travel ecosystem—the country"s outdated air traffic control
system.
Airlines For America says that the outdated system is responsible for
costing passengers $30 billion annually in delays, cancellations, and lost
productivity.

These issues are all heightened during busy holiday travel
times."And rubbing salt into the wounds of travelers nationwide is the news
that several airlines have chosen to increase baggage fees right in time for
the holidays, making air travel more expensive and more complicated.

Both
Frontier and Spirit Airlines are implementing higher bag fees for the holiday
season, from Nov.
19 until Jan.
5, with prices increased by up to $10 a
bag.


Want to survive this holiday season intact? Make sure to plan ahead,
and check out some more of our pro-tips right here."

Let World traveling
club Travel inspire you every day.
Hang out with us on"Facebook,"Twitter,
Instagram, and"Pinterest." More travelers, bad weather, and airline glitches
could serve up the most chaotic holiday travel season in years.
The holiday
season of 2014 saw 98.6 million Americans traveling, and that number is
expected rise this year.
In addition, lower gas prices mean Thanksgiving
travelers should be ready to face more congestion on the highways.."Outlooks
generally favor below-average temperatures and above-median precipitation
across the southern tier of the United States and above-average temperatures
and below-median precipitation over the northern tier of the United States"
the report explains."These weather patterns have the potential to cause
serious problems for people"s travel plans.Related: Passengers Keep Getting
Kicked Off Planes—What if it Happens to You?"It looks like with the
strong El Niño, we are more likely to stay in a wet, stormy,
low-visibility type of pattern across our Southern states," explains
meteorologist Mike Bettes, host of "Weather Underground" on The Weather
Channel.
"I would anticipate lots of rain, visibility issues that could cause
huge problems at airports.
Visibility is always a huge issue at airports
because it slows everything down."Visibility issues effect the road conditions
for drivers, too.""Some major Southern interstates, I-10, I-20 in the South,
then the I-95, I-85, I-75 in the Southeast, where we have a lot of car travel,
all have the potential to be problematic," Bettes says." The unpredictable
weather patterns caused by El" Niño will cause major problems on the
roads and in the air.
(Photo: Thinkstock)He recommends keeping a close eye on
the weather forecast in the run up to your holiday trip, and adjusting your
travel plans accordingly."We"re going to face more flight cancellations and
delays because of El Niño," said Daniel Farrar, CEO of travel technology
company Switchfly.
"And for travelers, El Niño will also mean some pretty
bumpy landings, takeoffs, and midflight turbulence."
Related: The Ultimate
Guide to Booking Holiday TravelAnd now for the third wrench in the whole
holiday travel ecosystem—the country"s outdated air traffic control
system.
Airlines For America says that the outdated system is responsible for
costing passengers $30 billion annually in delays, cancellations, and lost
productivity.

These issues are all heightened during busy holiday travel
times."And rubbing salt into the wounds of travelers nationwide is the news
that several airlines have chosen to increase baggage fees right in time for
the holidays, making air travel more expensive and more complicated.

Both
Frontier and Spirit Airlines are implementing higher bag fees for the holiday
season, from Nov.
19 until Jan.
5, with prices increased by up to $10 a
bag.


Want to survive this holiday season intact? Make sure to plan ahead,
and check out some more of our pro-tips right here."

Let World traveling
club Travel inspire you every day.
Hang out with us on"Facebook,"Twitter,
Instagram, and"Pinterest."More travelers, bad weather, and airline glitches
could serve up the most chaotic holiday travel season in years.
The holiday
season of 2014 saw 98.6 million Americans traveling, and that number is
expected rise this year.
In addition, lower gas prices mean Thanksgiving
travelers should be ready to face more congestion on the highways.

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