Saturday, November 14, 2015

The Smithsonian
Institution just scored a bag of Breaking Bad's infamous blue meth.
Earlier
this week, the cast of the lauded television show—in which a high school
chemistry teacher resorts to making meth when diagnosed with cancer—reunited
in Washington, DC, to present a donation of artifacts to the Smithsonian's
National Museum of American History.
Consisting mostly of clothing and props, these pieces of memorabilia include
the Tyvek suits and gas masks that main characters Walter White and Jesse
Pinkman wear while cooking meth, cups from the fictional fast food chain Los
Pollos Hermanos, and a "Better Call Saul" matchbook.
There's also the
pork pie hat that Walter White (played by actor Bryan Cranston) wore as his
anti-hero alias Heisenberg, the Drug Enforcement Administration ID badge of
Walter's brother-in-law Hank Schrader, and an iconic purple corkscrew.
The addition of these items to the Smithsonian museum's collection
underlines the multi-Emmy-Award-winning Breaking Bad's importance in
American television history and in our collective understanding of the
American Dream.
John Gray, director of the National Museum of American
History, explains in a statement that these items "help us document the ways
in which American entertainment reflects and influences our lives." He went
on to note that Breaking Bad—which concluded its five-season run in
2013—"offers us templates for understanding and confronting social
issues." Breaking Bad's creator Vince Gilligan was in Washington for
the announcement, along with actors Bryan Cranston, Aaron Paul, Dean Norris,
Jonathan Banks, and RJ Mitte.
Gilligan and museum officials delivered remarks,
some of which were documented on Twitter—including a photo of Cranston
trying on the Heisenberg hat for old times' sake.
Unfortunately, there are no plans to actually display these Breaking Bad
artifacts until 2018, when the American history museum's new exhibition on
American culture is slated to open in DC.
In that exhibition, Breaking Bad
will join the likes of Mad Men, The Wonder Years, and Seinfeld as key cultural
influencers.
Earlier this week, the cast of the lauded television show—in
which a high school chemistry teacher resorts to making meth when diagnosed
with cancer—reunited in Washington, DC, to present a donation of artifacts
to the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History.

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