Thursday, November 5, 2015

If you break the rules and/or push a flight attendant too far, you’re
gonna get kicked off the plane.
(Photo: iStock)Judging from the news lately,
one might think that there is a worldwide epidemic of people getting kicked
off airplanes.
As we reported here on World traveling club Travel, there have
been at least three separate occasions in the past few days of someone being
booted from a plane: A Wizz Air flight made an emergency landing in Sweden
after a passenger allegedly attempted to storm the cockpit
There was an American Airlines passenger who allegedly became disruptive on
a Tuesday Phoenix to New York flight, leading to an emergency landing in
Wichita, KS
Several people were kicked off a Spirit Airlines flight in Los Angeles
Tuesday because of (depending on whom you ask) a seat dispute, alleged
disruptive behavior by the passengers or alleged racial discrimination by the
flight crew.
As you read about these wild cases, there’s something you
should keep in mind: Flight crews are not looking to kick people off
planes.“It’s a terrible feeling and an awful decision to have to
make,” says Sarah Steegar, a flight attendant and columnist for
Flyertalk.com.WATCH: The 7 Stages of Getting Kicked Off a Flight“It
isn’t easy to get thrown off a plane,” adds flight attendant
Heather Poole author of Cruising Attitude: Tales of Crashpads, Crew Drama, and
Crazy Passengers at 35,000 Feet.
“It’s a big deal when it
happens.” She says removing a passenger from a flight is a huge hassle
for flight crews, who often have to explain their actions in a later
report.
“Nobody wants to come in on a day off to talk about what went
wrong,” she says.
“Nobody wants to be a bad
guy!”
That’s one reason why, despite the headlines, passengers
being removed from planes is relatively rare.
Poole says she’s never
personally kicked someone off a plane.
Neither has
Steegar.
“I’ve come very close to removing a passenger only two
or three times in 18 years,” Steegar says.
“Each time I gave a
last, VERY clear warning of what was about to happen.
And each time the
passenger shaped up and cut out what they were doing completely.
That’s
what saved them: sitting down and buttoning their lip and not saying another
word.”
Generally speaking, flight attendants would rather fly with you
than kick you off the plane. (Photo: iStock)Despite its rarity,
passengers do get kicked off planes.
Airlines generally reserve the right to
remove people for a variety of reasons, which often include being disorderly
or violent, being intoxicated or under the influence, interfering with the
flight crew, carrying a contagious disease, and even being barefoot or causing
an annoyance to other passengers.
Last week, a passenger got handcuffed and
kicked off a plane after she used the first-class
bathroom. 
We’re sure you’re a model passenger
who’d never be asked to leave a flight.
But just in case the
unthinkable were to happen, here’s what you should do if you’re
kicked off a plane.1. Apologize “You can try and apologize
sincerely” for the offense that has caused the flight crew to decide
they’d rather fly without you, says Steegar.
It won’t hurt, but
it probably won’t help.
“By the time we make the call,
we’re pretty sure what should happen,” Steegar says.
“In
my experience, we’re so fed up by that point.
It’s best to be
compliant and focus on how to salvage your travels beyond
that.”Related: Our Guilty Travel Pleasure — Videos of
People Getting Kicked Off Flights2.
To appeal or not to appeal?You could try
appealing to more senior crew members.
“Theoretically, you could appeal
to the purser (head flight attendant) and then to the captain,” says
Christopher Elliott, a travel blogger, consumer advocate and author of How To
Be The World’s Smartest Traveler.
But don’t count on a
successful appeal; Elliott says flight crews tend to be a tight-knit bunch and
are far more likely to side with their colleague than to overrule him or
her.
“I’m sure it’s happened,” Elliott says,
“but I’ve never heard of a fight attendant saying,
‘That’s it, you’re out of here’ [to a passenger]
and then getting overruled by someone else.”

Long story short, if a
flight crew member says to you, “You’ll have to leave,”
it’s best to just accept that you’re not going to be flying
anywhere on that plane.
You could try to appeal the decision to remove you
from the plane.
Good luck with that.
(Photo: iStock)
3.
Do not cause a scene
on your way outEven though you’ve been kicked off the plane, remember:
it can still get worse.
And it will if you start acting out.

“I have
to say if you’re not in jail by now you should consider yourself
lucky,” says Elliott.
“My advice would be to be as polite as you
possibly can.” Say an airline removes you from a flight for having had
one too many cocktails (which they are required to do).
If you’re nice
about it, the airline may simply remove you from the flight and book you on
the next one.
“Normally it’s just a matter of sobering
up,” says Elliott.
“You sit down [in the airport], have a glass
of water, and wait for the next flight.”Related: Why Are So Many
People Getting Kicked Off Planes?But if you’re one of those mean drunks
who gets verbally or physically abusive on the way out, airlines will have a
very different reaction — one that might include calling the police on
you and/or declaring you a security threat and refusing to fly you anywhere
ever again.
Says Elliott: “I’ve heard of airlines refunding the
ticket and saying, 'You’re on your own, you’re through
flying with us.’" Kicked off the plane? Yes, things could get
worse. (Photo: iStock)So remember, if you get removed from a plane,
you’re already on thin ice.
Being cool about it could mean the
difference between getting home later in the day or not at all.
"At this
point, [the airline is] gonna do whatever they want to do to you,” says
Elliott.4.
Go to the ticket counter Assuming you’ve left the
airplane on generally good terms, it’s time to make other travel
arrangements.
"The best thing to do is to go to the first ticket counter
and ask to be put on the next available flight,” says
Elliott.
“Because you were denied boarding, they should be able to put
you on the next flight at no additional charge.
I’ve also heard of
people who were kicked off a flight getting hotel and meal vouchers,
too.” This could definitely be a possibility if, say, your travel buddy
got kicked off a flight and you were just an innocent
victim. Related: Six Ways to Keep From Getting Kicked Off Your
Flight For a TweetElliott recommends checking out the airline’s
contracts of carriage.
Those contracts, which the airlines often post online,
detail the airline’s policies, including what they promise to do for
removed passengers.
Another good resource is the Department of Transportations
Fly-Rights page, which detail your rights owed to you as an involuntarily
bumped passenger. As long as you’re not a jerk about it, airlines
will likely work with you to get you on another flight. (Photo:
iStock)

5.
Demand nothing “I get emails from people all the
time saying, "I firmly demanded that…’” Elliott
says.
“I’m like, "You can’t 'firmly
demand’ anything.’” Remember: you were the one who got
kicked off the plane, so it’s best to remember you’re really at
the airline’s mercy.
So when making other arrangements, it’s
best to humbly throw yourself on the mercy of the airline rather than playing
the role of the wrongly aggrieved victim.
“Even though [the airlines]
may be required to do something, you also have to get home or wherever
you’re going,” says Elliott.
“So you don’t want to
piss off any more people.”
WATCH: How to Survive a 14-Hour FlightLet
World traveling club Travel inspire you every day.
Hang out with us
on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest. 
If you break the rules and/or push a flight attendant too far, you're gonna
get kicked off the plane.
As we reported here on World traveling club Travel,
there have been at least three separate occasions in the past few days of
someone being booted from a plane: A Wizz Air flight made an emergency landing
in Sweden after a passenger allegedly attempted to storm the cockpit There was
an American Airlines passenger who allegedly became disruptive on a Tuesday
Phoenix to New York flight, leading to an emergency landing in Wichita, KS
Several people were kicked off a Spirit Airlines flight in Los Angeles Tuesday
because of (depending on whom you ask) a seat dispute, alleged disruptive
behavior by the passengers or alleged racial discrimination by the flight
crew.
As you read about these wild cases, there's something you should keep
in mind: Flight crews are not looking to kick people off planes.
"It's a
terrible feeling and an awful decision to have to make," says Sarah Steegar,
a flight attendant and columnist for Flyertalk.com..You could try to appeal
the decision to remove you from the plane.
Good luck with that.
(Photo:
iStock)
3.
Do not cause a scene on your way outEven though you’ve been
kicked off the plane, remember: it can still get worse.
And it will if you
start acting out.

“I have to say if you’re not in jail by now
you should consider yourself lucky,” says Elliott.
“My advice
would be to be as polite as you possibly can.” Say an airline removes
you from a flight for having had one too many cocktails (which they are
required to do).
If you’re nice about it, the airline may simply remove
you from the flight and book you on the next one.
“Normally it’s
just a matter of sobering up,” says Elliott.
“You sit down [in
the airport], have a glass of water, and wait for the next
flight.”Related: Why Are So Many People Getting Kicked Off
Planes?But if you’re one of those mean drunks who gets verbally or
physically abusive on the way out, airlines will have a very different
reaction — one that might include calling the police on you and/or
declaring you a security threat and refusing to fly you anywhere ever
again.
Says Elliott: “I’ve heard of airlines refunding the
ticket and saying, 'You’re on your own, you’re through
flying with us.’" Kicked off the plane? Yes, things could get
worse. (Photo: iStock)So remember, if you get removed from a plane,
you’re already on thin ice.
Being cool about it could mean the
difference between getting home later in the day or not at all.
"At this
point, [the airline is] gonna do whatever they want to do to you,” says
Elliott.4.
Go to the ticket counter Assuming you’ve left the
airplane on generally good terms, it’s time to make other travel
arrangements.
"The best thing to do is to go to the first ticket counter
and ask to be put on the next available flight,” says
Elliott.
“Because you were denied boarding, they should be able to put
you on the next flight at no additional charge.
I’ve also heard of
people who were kicked off a flight getting hotel and meal vouchers,
too.” This could definitely be a possibility if, say, your travel buddy
got kicked off a flight and you were just an innocent
victim. Related: Six Ways to Keep From Getting Kicked Off Your
Flight For a TweetElliott recommends checking out the airline’s
contracts of carriage.
Those contracts, which the airlines often post online,
detail the airline’s policies, including what they promise to do for
removed passengers.
Another good resource is the Department of Transportations
Fly-Rights page, which detail your rights owed to you as an involuntarily
bumped passenger. As long as you’re not a jerk about it, airlines
will likely work with you to get you on another flight. (Photo:
iStock)

5.
Demand nothing “I get emails from people all the
time saying, "I firmly demanded that…’” Elliott
says.
“I’m like, "You can’t 'firmly
demand’ anything.’” Remember: you were the one who got
kicked off the plane, so it’s best to remember you’re really at
the airline’s mercy.
So when making other arrangements, it’s
best to humbly throw yourself on the mercy of the airline rather than playing
the role of the wrongly aggrieved victim.
“Even though [the airlines]
may be required to do something, you also have to get home or wherever
you’re going,” says Elliott.
“So you don’t want to
piss off any more people.”
WATCH: How to Survive a 14-Hour FlightLet
World traveling club Travel inspire you every day.
Hang out with us
on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest. 
If you break
the rules and/or push a flight attendant too far, you're gonna get kicked
off the plane.
As we reported here on World traveling club Travel, there have
been at least three separate occasions in the past few days of someone being
booted from a plane: A Wizz Air flight made an emergency landing in Sweden
after a passenger allegedly attempted to storm the cockpit There was an
American Airlines passenger who allegedly became disruptive on a Tuesday
Phoenix to New York flight, leading to an emergency landing in Wichita, KS
Several people were kicked off a Spirit Airlines flight in Los Angeles Tuesday
because of (depending on whom you ask) a seat dispute, alleged disruptive
behavior by the passengers or alleged racial discrimination by the flight
crew.
As you read about these wild cases, there's something you should keep
in mind: Flight crews are not looking to kick people off planes.
"It's a
terrible feeling and an awful decision to have to make," says Sarah Steegar,
a flight attendant and columnist for Flyertalk.com.

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