Thursday, July 9, 2015

Jennifer Steil is the author of the forthcoming novel The Ambassador’s Wife (Doubleday, July 28, 2015) and the memoir The Woman Who Fell From the Sky.
World traveling club Travel got an advance copy of The Ambassador’s Wife, and we promise it is going to be the must-read book for August.
  An aerial view of La Paz, Bolivia.
(Photo: David Almeida/Flickr)Chances are, you can’t get higher on a night out than you can in La Paz, Bolivia.
At close to 12,000 feet above sea level, La Paz is the world’s highest de facto capital city.
In this spot cradled by jagged Andean peaks, there’s a lot less oxygen and alcohol goes a lot further.
Barhopping on your first night in the city is not recommended.
Give your body a few days to adjust to the lofty heights and accumulate red blood cells before a night on the town.
And at the risk of sounding like your mother, make sure you drink plenty of water in between singani sours! Start in the center, the city’s highest point, and work your way downhill to the lively neighborhoods of Sopocachi and Calacoto.
3 p.
m.
Bolivians fortify themselves against the altitude with regular consumption of coca tea.
So start your afternoon at Café Restaurant Angelo Colonial — near the touristy Sagarnaga Street in the center of town — with a pot of tea brewed from fresh coca leaves.
Packed with an eclectic assortment of antique clocks, maps, oil paintings of the city, and rusting kitchen implements glued to the wall, it’s homey and relaxed.
The menu includes vegetarian fare as well as Bolivian specialties such as quinoa and llama.
If you fancy a more modern ambience and homemade pastries with your tea, go to the nearby Café Illampu.
(It also has one of the best breakfasts in the city, with artisanal local yogurts.
) Stroll down the cobblestone streets to the entrance to the Coca Museum.
(Photo: Mark Pearson / Alamy)
Both cafés are just a few doors down from the Coca Museum.
It’s cramped and slightly shabby, but if you take the time to read the exhibits you’ll discover a trove of information about the plant’s history, pharmaceutical benefits, and illicit uses.
Related: How to Spend the Perfect Thursday Night in BarcelonaBefore you leave the street, pop into Artesania Sorata, which sells some of the highest-quality alpaca sweaters, scarves, and capes in the city.
The nights in La Paz get quite chilly, so bundle up! Related: Reindeer Tacos and Native Brews — A Great Night Out in Anchorage5 p.
m.
You must grab a cocktail from Sol y Luna.
(Photo: Sol y Luna / Facebook)Have your first drink or a late lunch at Sol y Luna, a candlelit restaurant with rough stone walls and a pool table in a back room.
Sample a Saya, a Bolivian microbrew; a glass of Tannat produced by Campos de Solana in the wine-growing region of Tarija; or a spicy shot of Supay, named for the Incan god of the underworld.
The wide-ranging menu includes a hearty goulash, roast lamb, black quinoa, and coca crepes made with tarwi, an Andean species of lupin.
Every Thursday there’s live salsa music.
Next door to Sol y Luna is the cheerful and popular Oliver’s English Tavern, with worn wooden floors, comfortable leather benches, and slate chalkboards scrawled with sayings like, “Alcohol: The cause of and solution to all of life’s problems.
” Food includes British favorites such as bangers and mash, vegetable curries, and bread-and-butter pudding.
6:30 p.
m.
During happy hour at Layka, 6:30 to 8:30 p.
m.
, customers get a free shot every hour.
This bar/restaurant is worth a visit for several reasons, not least for its lurid murals of demons indulging in gluttony and greed.
Specialties include a singani — a Bolivian grape liquor — distilled with an actual boa constrictor.
Only after you’ve taken a sip of the mild, floral singani will the bartender whip the cloth off of the bottle to show you the coiled snake inside.
Bolivian mythology holds that drinking this will give you the “power of the snake.
” The bar also offers a dark, herby alcohol made of seven secret ingredients.
Guess all seven and drink for free.
From 8:30 to 10 p.
m.
the bar becomes a traditional peña, where musicians gather to play Bolivian folk music.
Food includes guinea pig, llama, and a buffet of 38 dishes.
Don’t fill up here, though — save your appetite for dinner.
8 p.
m.
Find Etno tucked among the city’s best museums on Calle Jaen.
A cozy, cavelike bar with arched brick ceilings and murals of dragons and llamas, Etno specializes in Bolivian-crafted alcohols.
Its extensive cocktail list includes the “Tour of Bolivia,” five shots from five distilleries: a fiery absinthe, herby whiskey, and sweet coca, maracuya, and dulce de leche liqueurs.
Also try a range of Bolivian wines, singanis, beers, specialty daiquiris, and divine thin-crust pizzas.
Live music and poetry readings take place here, too.

Related: Everything You Need to Know About Hitting the Town in Bangkok Settle in next to an old engine at Diesel Nacional.
(Photo: Diesel Nacional/Facebook)Old train tracks lead to the door of nearby Diesel Nacional, a bar/restaurant with the ambience of an auto mechanic’s workshop.
Sip a chuflay under an airplane engine and trumpets dangling from the ceiling while warming up by the central fireplace.
9 p.
m.
Gustu dish (Photo: Gustu/Facebook)The elegant Gustu is a half-hour taxi ride from the city center but absolutely worth the trip.
Founded by Claus Meyer, co-owner of Denmark’s Noma, often rated the world’s best restaurant, Gustu prides itself on the creative use of in-season Bolivian products.
It also trains Bolivians in all aspects of the business.
Order the tasting menu, a five- or seven-course meal with beverage pairing, to savor some of the most exceptional food in the country.
Don’t skip the specialty cocktails, especially the singani laced with spicy llajua or the Api Old Fashioned.
Too lazy to get to Gustu? Try the French-inspired cuisine of La Guingette on Plaza Avaroa in Sopocachi, one of La Paz’s hippest neighborhoods.
Sit on the balcony overlooking the square and watch the club kids stroll by.
11 p.
m.
Have a quiet post-dinner drink at Hallwright’s, a friendly wine bar offering Bolivian vintages, cocktails, and gourmet tapas.
Specialties include llama salami and ham made in El Alto.
Get comfy at this former brothel.
(Photo: Cafe Magic K)For entertainment, try MagicK, a new bar/restaurant in a former brothel that hosts a variety of cultural events: live music, standup comedy, dance performances, theater, poetry readings, independent film screenings, and food fairs.
Order an orange-and-thyme g&t made with locally crafted gin and a plate of the best vegetarian nachos in town.
All food is made from in-season Bolivian produce.
12 p.
m.
Those with stamina should head to Glam Restaurant and Jazzy Lounge, a spot that is much-beloved by Bolivians.
Get your groove on to garage, techno, or Cuban music under a lazily spinning disco ball.
 Don’t want to spend the night alone? Mingle dancing with cozy chats by the fire at Mongo’s Rock Bottom Café, renowned for being the best spot for Bolivians to pick up foreigners.
If you overdo it, stop at a 24-hour pharmacy on your way home and ask for chaky pills, which Paçeños swear cure hangovers.
Addresses:Café Restaurant Angelo Colonial, Linares 922, La Paz +591 (2) 236 0199 Café Illampu, Calle Linares 940, 1st Floor, La PazOliver’s English Tavern, Calle Murillo esq.
Cochabamba 999, La Paz +591-2-2120764Layka, Linares 288, La Paz  +59177747247La Guingette, Calle Pedro Salazar 497, Esquina Sanchez Lima, Plaza Avaroa - Sopocachi, La Paz +591 2412519Hallwright’s, Sanchez Lima 2235, La Paz, Bolivia, +591 67024250MagicK, Presbitero Medina 2526, Pedro Salazar Corner, Sopocachi, La Paz, +591 77553535Glam, Sanchez Lima 2237, La Paz, +591 2423446Mongo’s Rock Bottom Café, Hermanos Manchego N° 2444, entre Calle Salinas y Salazar, Sopocachi, La Paz +591-2-2440714Diesel Nacional, Av.
20 de Octubre, entre calles Fernando Guachalla y Rosendo Gutierrez +591 (2)2423477Let World traveling club Travel inspire you every day.
Hang out with us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest.
 Check out our original adventure travel series, “A Broad Abroad.
”  From a real life Ambassador's wife.
.
.
here's everything you need to know about the perfect night out in La Paz.
.
Related: Reindeer Tacos and Native Brews — A Great Night Out in Anchorage5 p.
m.
You must grab a cocktail from Sol y Luna.
(Photo: Sol y Luna / Facebook)Have your first drink or a late lunch at Sol y Luna, a candlelit restaurant with rough stone walls and a pool table in a back room.
Sample a Saya, a Bolivian microbrew; a glass of Tannat produced by Campos de Solana in the wine-growing region of Tarija; or a spicy shot of Supay, named for the Incan god of the underworld.
The wide-ranging menu includes a hearty goulash, roast lamb, black quinoa, and coca crepes made with tarwi, an Andean species of lupin.
Every Thursday there’s live salsa music.
Next door to Sol y Luna is the cheerful and popular Oliver’s English Tavern, with worn wooden floors, comfortable leather benches, and slate chalkboards scrawled with sayings like, “Alcohol: The cause of and solution to all of life’s problems.
” Food includes British favorites such as bangers and mash, vegetable curries, and bread-and-butter pudding.
6:30 p.
m.
During happy hour at Layka, 6:30 to 8:30 p.
m.
, customers get a free shot every hour.
This bar/restaurant is worth a visit for several reasons, not least for its lurid murals of demons indulging in gluttony and greed.
Specialties include a singani — a Bolivian grape liquor — distilled with an actual boa constrictor.
Only after you’ve taken a sip of the mild, floral singani will the bartender whip the cloth off of the bottle to show you the coiled snake inside.
Bolivian mythology holds that drinking this will give you the “power of the snake.
” The bar also offers a dark, herby alcohol made of seven secret ingredients.
Guess all seven and drink for free.
From 8:30 to 10 p.
m.
the bar becomes a traditional peña, where musicians gather to play Bolivian folk music.
Food includes guinea pig, llama, and a buffet of 38 dishes.
Don’t fill up here, though — save your appetite for dinner.
8 p.
m.
Find Etno tucked among the city’s best museums on Calle Jaen.
A cozy, cavelike bar with arched brick ceilings and murals of dragons and llamas, Etno specializes in Bolivian-crafted alcohols.
Its extensive cocktail list includes the “Tour of Bolivia,” five shots from five distilleries: a fiery absinthe, herby whiskey, and sweet coca, maracuya, and dulce de leche liqueurs.
Also try a range of Bolivian wines, singanis, beers, specialty daiquiris, and divine thin-crust pizzas.
Live music and poetry readings take place here, too.

Related: Everything You Need to Know About Hitting the Town in Bangkok Settle in next to an old engine at Diesel Nacional.
(Photo: Diesel Nacional/Facebook)Old train tracks lead to the door of nearby Diesel Nacional, a bar/restaurant with the ambience of an auto mechanic’s workshop.
Sip a chuflay under an airplane engine and trumpets dangling from the ceiling while warming up by the central fireplace.
9 p.
m.
Gustu dish (Photo: Gustu/Facebook)The elegant Gustu is a half-hour taxi ride from the city center but absolutely worth the trip.
Founded by Claus Meyer, co-owner of Denmark’s Noma, often rated the world’s best restaurant, Gustu prides itself on the creative use of in-season Bolivian products.
It also trains Bolivians in all aspects of the business.
Order the tasting menu, a five- or seven-course meal with beverage pairing, to savor some of the most exceptional food in the country.
Don’t skip the specialty cocktails, especially the singani laced with spicy llajua or the Api Old Fashioned.
Too lazy to get to Gustu? Try the French-inspired cuisine of La Guingette on Plaza Avaroa in Sopocachi, one of La Paz’s hippest neighborhoods.
Sit on the balcony overlooking the square and watch the club kids stroll by.
11 p.
m.
Have a quiet post-dinner drink at Hallwright’s, a friendly wine bar offering Bolivian vintages, cocktails, and gourmet tapas.
Specialties include llama salami and ham made in El Alto.
Get comfy at this former brothel.
(Photo: Cafe Magic K)For entertainment, try MagicK, a new bar/restaurant in a former brothel that hosts a variety of cultural events: live music, standup comedy, dance performances, theater, poetry readings, independent film screenings, and food fairs.
Order an orange-and-thyme g&t made with locally crafted gin and a plate of the best vegetarian nachos in town.
All food is made from in-season Bolivian produce.
12 p.
m.
Those with stamina should head to Glam Restaurant and Jazzy Lounge, a spot that is much-beloved by Bolivians.
Get your groove on to garage, techno, or Cuban music under a lazily spinning disco ball.
 Don’t want to spend the night alone? Mingle dancing with cozy chats by the fire at Mongo’s Rock Bottom Café, renowned for being the best spot for Bolivians to pick up foreigners.
If you overdo it, stop at a 24-hour pharmacy on your way home and ask for chaky pills, which Paçeños swear cure hangovers.
Addresses:Café Restaurant Angelo Colonial, Linares 922, La Paz +591 (2) 236 0199 Café Illampu, Calle Linares 940, 1st Floor, La PazOliver’s English Tavern, Calle Murillo esq.
Cochabamba 999, La Paz +591-2-2120764Layka, Linares 288, La Paz  +59177747247La Guingette, Calle Pedro Salazar 497, Esquina Sanchez Lima, Plaza Avaroa - Sopocachi, La Paz +591 2412519Hallwright’s, Sanchez Lima 2235, La Paz, Bolivia, +591 67024250MagicK, Presbitero Medina 2526, Pedro Salazar Corner, Sopocachi, La Paz, +591 77553535Glam, Sanchez Lima 2237, La Paz, +591 2423446Mongo’s Rock Bottom Café, Hermanos Manchego N° 2444, entre Calle Salinas y Salazar, Sopocachi, La Paz +591-2-2440714Diesel Nacional, Av.
20 de Octubre, entre calles Fernando Guachalla y Rosendo Gutierrez +591 (2)2423477Let World traveling club Travel inspire you every day.
Hang out with us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest.
 Check out our original adventure travel series, “A Broad Abroad.
”  From a real life Ambassador's wife.
.
.
here's everything you need to know about the perfect night out in La Paz.

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