Friday, July 31, 2015

By Susan Portnoy Cecil the Lion was illegally shot by an American hunter,
but he’s not the only animal in danger from trophy-hunting tourism.
(Photo: Andy Loveridge/Wildlife Conservation Research Unit via AP)I admit it.
When I read the account of Cecil the lion’s untimely and insidious
demise, I wanted to find Walt Palmer, and those who enabled him, and scratch
their eyes out.
 I wanted to scream when I read that they had baited him so they could
lure Cecil out of a protected reserve and on to private property where Palmer
shot him with a bow and arrow.
I wanted to cry when I thought of that magnificent creature wounded and in
pain for 40 hours while the men tracked him down and gleefully ended his life
with bullet.
 Yet I am buoyed by the fact that people around the world have taken this
tragedy to heart and have raised their collective hands in outrage.
I empathize with the hateful feelings that are being flung at Palmer online
and elsewhere, but I wish everyone would stop now and use all those powerful
emotions for more a productive end.
 You see Cecil isn’t alone.
He’s just more famous.
 Every day lions are killed in Africa.
Lions that deserve our respect and protection.
Poachers, conflicts with local villagers, canned hunting, and trophy hunters
have helped bring the total population down to a mere 30,000.
(According to National Geographic’s Big Cat Initiative, in 1940 that
number was over 450,000.
) 
Related: Revealed: Killer of Famed African Lion Cecil Is an
American Dentist?So hate Walt Palmer for what he’s done if you must,
but it’s over.
Cecil is gone.
Let’s focus on all the lions that need our help and maybe, in the end,
Cecil’s death will have some meaning.
 There are many ways you can help, including supporting the
following organizations and World Lion Day, which returns for its third year
on August 10.
 World Lion Day is the first global campaign to celebrate the importance
of these cats worldwide, and its timing this year couldn’t be more
perfect.
You can get involved with efforts to save lions and other big cats via the
following campaigns:National Geographic’s #5forBigCats: Give $5.
Save Big Cats.
 "Lions and other big cats need a lot more than that if they’re
going to avoid going extinct in the wild, but it’s easier than you
think to help them out.
Share the image below or your own high-five photo or video on social media
and tag five friends with #5forBigCats.
Then donate here (or in the U.
S.
, text "FIVE" to 50555) to give $5 to National Geographic’s Big Cats
Initiative.
"  Share this image to help raise awareness of National
Geographic’s campaign to save lions and other big cats.
(Photo: Beverly Joubert)World Conservation Research Unit (The team that
monitored Cecil) At the WildCRU, in the Recanati-Kaplan Centre at Oxford,
we are studying lions in various parts of Africa to uncover the science that
will inform and underpin their conservation.
This is urgent, because lion numbers are precariously low, estimated at fewer
than 30,000 across the continent and we have evidence that there are actually
fewer.
We have worked on the lions of Hwange National Park, with the support and
collaboration of the excellent Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management
Authority.
Our goal is to understand the threats that lions face, and to use
cutting-edge science to underpin solutions to those threats.
Donations can be made here.
 Related: ‘Lion Whisperer’: Tourists Will Always Break
Rules Around Wild Animals
Living with Lions  
Living with Lions is
a conservation research group of seven scientists and 34 Maasai warriors
working in non-protected areas of Kenya to save the remaining wild lions and
other predators outside National Parks.
Make a donation here.
Panthera – Project LeonardoPanthera has brought together the
world’s leading wild cat experts to direct and implement effective
conservation strategies for the world’s largest and most endangered
cats: lions, cheetahs, leopards, tigers, jaguars and snow leopards.
Their approach to wild cat conservation is rooted in science and based upon
decades of first hand field experience.
For African lions Panthera envisions populations recovering to more than
30,000 individuals across at least 20 key lion conservation landscapes.
Panthera are leaders in range-wide program to protect critical habitats and
core populations connected by genetic and biological corridors, mitigating the
threats of habitat loss and conversion, human-lion conflict, bushmeat poaching
and excessive trophy hunting.
For more information and how to support Panthera visit  www.
panthera.
orgMara Naboisho Lion ProjectSituated in the Mara Naboisho Conservancy of
Kenya, the MNLP are undertaking vital research on the resident lion population
in this joint conservancy.
Kenya’s lions are dwindling by about 100 animals every year due
primarily to human-lion conflict.
The Mara Naboisho is focused on stakeholders and local communities working
together to share benefits from nature based tourism which in turn contributes
to wildlife conservation.
Understanding and monitoring how these incentives are effecting the lion
population is important for creating sound lion-conservation management plans.
For more information and how to support this program visit www.
mnlp.
org.
The Masai Mara’s famous Scar.
(Photo: Susan Portnoy/Insatiable Traveler)
Lion GuardiansLion Guardians have
a unique approach that relies on and preserves the cultural traditions of
pastoralist communities while at the same time actively engaging warriors in
protecting lions rather than killing them.
 Lion Guardians monitor lion movements, warn pastoralists when lions are
in the area, recover lost livestock, reinforce protective fencing and
intervene to stop lion hunting parties, resulting in reduced livestock and
losses and therefore the need to retaliate.
More than 40 warriors are employed as Lion Guardians covering over 4,000
square kilometers of key wildlife habitat in Kenya’s Amboseli
ecosystem, as well as the Ruaha landscape of Tanzania.
Lion killing in the Lion Guardians’ areas has been nearly eliminated
and the Amboseli lion population is now growing, making this important
ecosystem one of the few areas in Africa where lion numbers are on the rise.
For more information and how to support this program visit www.
lionguardians.
org.
Ruaha Carnivore ProjectThe Ruaha Carnivore Project, part of Oxford
University’s Wildlife Conservation Research Unit (WildCRU), aims to
help develop effective conservation strategies for large carnivores in
Tanzania’s remote Ruaha landscape.
The area supports around 10% of Africa’s lions making it an extremely
important conservation area however the population has been understudied.
The project is working to gather baseline data on population numbers and
ecology whilst working alongside local communities to reduce human-carnivore
conflict.
For more information and how to support this program visit www.
ruahacarnivoreproject.
com and www.
houstonzoo.
org/lionssp/projects/ruaha-carnivore-project.
Two sweet females that were rolling with joy to be reunited after a long
night (Photo: Susan Portnoy/Insatiable Traveler)
Desert Lion
Conservation ProjectNamibia supports a unique population of desert-adapted
lions that survive in the harsh Namib Desert.
The "Desert" lion is a prominent feature in Namibia and is highly valued,
both aesthetically and financially, by the growing tourism industry.
The Desert Lion Conservation project was started in 1998 with the aim to
collect sound ecological data, address human-lion conflicts, and to develop a
conservation strategy.
Applied research and sound scientific data on lion movements and dispersal,
and the ecological mechanisms that regulate the population are fundamental to
this process.
For more information and how to support this program visit www.
desertlion.
info and contact info@tosco.
orgLionAidLionAid is a charity with a difference.
Based in the UK, they are working to create much needed conservation
awareness surrounding the lion.
They are actively urging the UK government and EU to ban the importation of
lion trophies in a bid to reduce lion trophy hunting in Africa.
They have approached the IUCN imploring them to list those lion populations
of west and central Africa as ‘regionally endangered’ and are
also working to have the lion listed as an UNESCO World Heritage Species to
bring about further recognition of the species and protection.
For more information and how to support this program visit www.
lionaid.
org.
More from The Insatiable Traveler: The Horror Of Canned Lion Hunting And
What You Can Do To Stop It
The Elusive Desert-Adapted Lions of Namibia and
the Man Who Loves Them
What A Lion’s Yawn And Brangelina Have In
Common
Start Your Travels Off Right With These 11 Great Pre-Trip Prep TipsSix
Photography Tips I Learned From A Wildlife Photographer You Can Use Anytime,
AnywhereWATCH: On the Frontlines of the Rhino ‘Genocide’: Saving
A Species on the Brink </b>
Let World traveling club Travel inspire you every day.
Check out our original adventure travel series A Broad Abroad.

Here&#39;s how you can help in the wake of Cecil the Lion&#39;s death.
.
World Conservation Research Unit (The team that monitored Cecil)&#xA0;At the
WildCRU, in the Recanati-Kaplan Centre at Oxford, we are studying lions in
various parts of Africa to uncover the science that will inform and underpin
their conservation.
This is urgent, because lion numbers are precariously low, estimated at fewer
than 30,000 across the continent and we have evidence that there are actually
fewer.
We have worked on the lions of Hwange National Park, with the support and
collaboration of the excellent Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management
Authority.
Our goal is to understand the threats that lions face, and to use
cutting-edge science to underpin solutions to those threats.
Donations can be made here.
&#xA0;Related: &#x2018;Lion Whisperer&#x2019;: Tourists Will Always Break
Rules Around Wild Animals
Living with Lions&#xA0;&#xA0;
Living with Lions is
a conservation research group of seven scientists and 34 Maasai warriors
working in non-protected areas of Kenya to save the remaining wild lions and
other predators outside National Parks.
Make a donation here.
Panthera &#x2013; Project LeonardoPanthera has brought together the
world&#x2019;s leading wild cat experts to direct and implement effective
conservation strategies for the world&#x2019;s largest and most endangered
cats: lions, cheetahs, leopards, tigers, jaguars and snow leopards.
Their approach to wild cat conservation is rooted in science and based upon
decades of first hand field experience.
For African lions Panthera envisions populations recovering to more than
30,000 individuals across at least 20 key lion conservation landscapes.
Panthera are leaders in range-wide program to protect critical habitats and
core populations connected by genetic and biological corridors, mitigating the
threats of habitat loss and conversion, human-lion conflict, bushmeat poaching
and excessive trophy hunting.
For more information and how to support Panthera visit &#xA0;www.
panthera.
orgMara Naboisho Lion ProjectSituated in the Mara Naboisho Conservancy of
Kenya, the MNLP are undertaking vital research on the resident lion population
in this joint conservancy.
Kenya&#x2019;s lions are dwindling by about 100 animals every year due
primarily to human-lion conflict.
The Mara Naboisho is focused on stakeholders and local communities working
together to share benefits from nature based tourism which in turn contributes
to wildlife conservation.
Understanding and monitoring how these incentives are effecting the lion
population is important for creating sound lion-conservation management plans.
For more information and how to support this program visit www.
mnlp.
org.
The Masai Mara&#x2019;s famous Scar.
(Photo: Susan Portnoy/Insatiable Traveler)
Lion GuardiansLion Guardians have
a unique approach that relies on and preserves the cultural traditions of
pastoralist communities while at the same time actively engaging warriors in
protecting lions rather than killing them.
&#xA0;Lion Guardians monitor lion movements, warn pastoralists when lions are
in the area, recover lost livestock, reinforce protective fencing and
intervene to stop lion hunting parties, resulting in reduced livestock and
losses and therefore the need to retaliate.
More than 40 warriors are employed as Lion Guardians covering over 4,000
square kilometers of key wildlife habitat in Kenya&#x2019;s Amboseli
ecosystem, as well as the Ruaha landscape of Tanzania.
Lion killing in the Lion Guardians&#x2019; areas has been nearly eliminated
and the Amboseli lion population is now growing, making this important
ecosystem one of the few areas in Africa where lion numbers are on the rise.
For more information and how to support this program visit&#xA0;www.
lionguardians.
org.
Ruaha Carnivore ProjectThe Ruaha Carnivore Project, part of Oxford
University&#x2019;s Wildlife Conservation Research Unit (WildCRU), aims to
help develop effective conservation strategies for large carnivores in
Tanzania&#x2019;s remote Ruaha landscape.
The area supports around 10% of Africa&#x2019;s lions making it an extremely
important conservation area however the population has been understudied.
The project is working to gather baseline data on population numbers and
ecology whilst working alongside local communities to reduce human-carnivore
conflict.
For more information and how to support this program visit www.
ruahacarnivoreproject.
com&#xA0;and www.
houstonzoo.
org/lionssp/projects/ruaha-carnivore-project.
Two sweet females that were rolling with joy to be reunited after a long
night&#xA0;(Photo: Susan Portnoy/Insatiable Traveler)
Desert Lion
Conservation ProjectNamibia supports a unique population of desert-adapted
lions that survive in the harsh Namib Desert.
The "Desert" lion is a prominent feature in Namibia and is highly valued,
both aesthetically and financially, by the growing tourism industry.
The Desert Lion Conservation project was started in 1998 with the aim to
collect sound ecological data, address human-lion conflicts, and to develop a
conservation strategy.
Applied research and sound scientific data on lion movements and dispersal,
and the ecological mechanisms that regulate the population are fundamental to
this process.
For more information and how to support this program visit&#xA0;www.
desertlion.
info and contact info@tosco.
orgLionAidLionAid is a charity with a difference.
Based in the UK, they are working to create much needed conservation
awareness surrounding the lion.
They are actively urging the UK government and EU to ban the importation of
lion trophies in a bid to reduce lion trophy hunting in Africa.
They have approached the IUCN imploring them to list those lion populations
of west and central Africa as &#x2018;regionally endangered&#x2019; and are
also working to have the lion listed as an UNESCO World Heritage Species to
bring about further recognition of the species and protection.
For more information and how to support this program visit www.
lionaid.
org.
More from The Insatiable Traveler:&#xA0;The Horror Of Canned Lion Hunting And
What You Can Do To Stop It
The Elusive Desert-Adapted Lions of Namibia and
the Man Who Loves Them
What A Lion&#x2019;s Yawn And Brangelina Have In
Common
Start Your Travels Off Right With These 11 Great Pre-Trip Prep TipsSix
Photography Tips I Learned From A Wildlife Photographer You Can Use Anytime,
AnywhereWATCH: On the Frontlines of the Rhino &#x2018;Genocide&#x2019;: Saving
A Species on the Brink </b>
Let World traveling club Travel inspire you every day.
Check out our original adventure travel series A Broad Abroad.

Here&#39;s how you can help in the wake of Cecil the Lion&#39;s death.

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