In an old Moroccan city, the 500-year-old blue magic tradition is preserved. The legend says
that women join in the night, to paint streets and homes, all in blue. Thousands of tourists e
each year visit the city to see this magical route. The city has acquired the nickname "Blue Pearl".
It is said that the Jews settled there after the expulsion from Spain in the 15th century. They painted them
blue houses, as a sign of cultural and religious beliefs. In Judaism, blue color represents
divinity.

Anyway, if you are planning a trip to Morocco, do not forget to make a stop in this absolutely sublime village, with intense and deep blue nuances .

Chefchaouen day trips is a small town perched in the mountains of northeastern Morocco offering a most magical Mediterranean setting. It is a place with the great blue corridors mythical whitewashed with lime and the authentic and welcoming atmosphere. After spending 2 days discovering the wonders of this blue paradise, I conclude that this is my favorite city in Morocco for its soothing atmosphere and its unreal beauty.




Without hesitation, go wandering among this blue labyrinth. A place that rests on tranquility, peace and harmony. I have probably met the most colorful people, but also the most smiling and generous of their time.


This city is a balm for the exhausted traveler, a muse for the passionate photographer and a jewel for the avid adventurer of discoveries. It is with a touch of nostalgia that I invite you to discover this funny medina. This old town where you will be offered as much mint tea as marijuana and where you can juggle between French and Spanish. This destination where you can take the time to let yourself go and enjoy calmly the cultural diversity of northern Morocco very different from the rest of the country.
How to get in—and what not to miss—at the world"s best new
airport lounges.
The Sprawling Stunner: VIP Lounge by LATAM
Photo: Latam
Airlines GroupWhere: Santiago"s SCL West Area, fourth and fifth floorsGetting
In: $50 for a day pass; free with a LATAM Premium Economy ticket, Oneworld
Premium Business ticket, or Oneworld Sapphire status.Design: The
23,000-squarefoot lounge is South America"s largest, featuring replicas of
indigenous stone artifacts and a copper-lined grand staircase.Food: The
international buffet includes sushi, cheese, and charcuterie platters, and
bottles of Chilean Carmenère.Perks: Dedicated rooms cover everything from
naps to video games (handheld PlayStation Vita devices included).Related: Love
to Lounge? Great Airport Lounges for Business TravelersThe Culinary Mecca:
Virgin Atlantic ClubhousePhoto: Tom SibleyWhere: Los Angeles"s LAX, T2Getting
In: Free for Virgin Atlantic fliers with an Upper Class ticket or Gold status
with Flying Club or Delta SkyMiles.Design: Midcentury Modern with a bit of
edge—bronze pendant lights, Arne Jacobsen Swan chairs, and a massive
black-and-white mural.Food: Small plates from of-themoment Century City
restaurant Hinoki & the Bird, along with blends from the Juicery (this is
L.A., after all).Perks: Cowshed products in the bathrooms; views of the
Hollywood Hills.The Zen Oasis: Centurion Lounge MiamiPhoto: Evan SungWhere:
Miami"s MIA, North Terminal, Concourse DGetting In: Free for top-tier American
Express cardholders; $50 with other Amex cards.Design: Bright and airy, with
floor-to-ceiling windows and a wall covered in live succulents.Food: Seasonal
comfort dishes, like fried chicken with watermelon salad, come courtesy of
local star chef Michelle Bernstein; the cocktail menu is by the legendary Jim
Meehan, of Manhattan"s PDT.Perks: The Exhale Spa offers 15-minute manicures; a
soundproof kids" room is a benefit for all travelers.The Design Star: Cathay
Pacific"s Pier First Class LoungePhoto: Carmen ChanWhere: Hong Kong"s HKG,
Northwest Concourse, Gate 63Getting In: Free with Oneworld Emerald status or a
first-class Oneworld ticket.Design: A horseshoe-shaped onyx bar and a library
filled with bronze workstations—all designed by Ilse
Crawford—lend a luxe pied-à-terre vibe.Food: A pantry stocks
grab-and-go snacks, and the dining room serves entrées like char siu bao
(barbecued-pork buns).Perks: Foot and neck massages can be had in eight day
suites; the 14 showers have Aesop bath products.The Service Wiz: SilverKris
Lounge by Singapore AirlinesPhoto: Singapore AirlinesWhere: London"s LHR,
T2Getting In: Free with a first- or business-class ticket, or Star Alliance
Gold status.Design: Interiors firm Ong & Ong is known for using natural
materials—here, they"ve paired batik and blond wood with dramatic
wingback chairs and modular work pods.Food: The menus have both Asian and
Western fare—try the Hainanese chicken rice and a Singapore
Sling.Perks: First-class passengers get butler service: welcome drinks, hot
towels, and more.More from Travel + Leisure:In Moscow, an Unexpected Creative
RevolutionThe Real Reason There"s a Tiny Hole in Airplane Windows18 Beautiful
Photos of Fall From Around the WorldWATCH: 4 Hacks to Help You Breeze Through
Airport Security"Let World traveling club Travel inspire you every day.
"Watch World traveling club Travel"s original series "A Broad Abroad." How to
get in—and what not to miss—at the world's best new airport lounges.
The
Sprawling Stunner: VIP Lounge by LATAM Photo: Latam Airlines Group Where:
Santiago's SCL West Area, fourth and fifth floors Getting In: $50 for a day
pass; free with a LATAM Premium Economy ticket, Oneworld Premium Business
ticket, or Oneworld Sapphire status.
Design: The 23,000-squarefoot lounge is
South America's largest, featuring replicas of indigenous stone artifacts
and a copper-lined grand staircase.
Food: The international buffet includes
sushi, cheese, and charcuterie platters, and bottles of Chilean
Carmenère..How to get in—and what not to miss—at the world's best new
airport lounges.
The Sprawling Stunner: VIP Lounge by LATAM Photo: Latam
Airlines Group Where: Santiago's SCL West Area, fourth and fifth floors
Getting In: $50 for a day pass; free with a LATAM Premium Economy ticket,
Oneworld Premium Business ticket, or Oneworld Sapphire status.
Design: The
23,000-squarefoot lounge is South America's largest, featuring replicas of
indigenous stone artifacts and a copper-lined grand staircase.
Food: The
international buffet includes sushi, cheese, and charcuterie platters, and
bottles of Chilean Carmenère.
Like many chefs, Doug
Paine of the Hotel Vermont is interested in local, sustainable cuisine. On November 7, the hotel will take that culinary mentality to the next level by hosting Wild About Vermont, a meal showcasing the state's finest fish and wild game.
 Local hunters and fisherman are donating their catches for the meal, and so is the Vermont Fish and Wildlife bureau, who will supply three animals who were injured or killed on the states roads. That's right: roadkill. "The idea is to get people connected to their local food
sources, but also to showcase the traditions of Vermont," Chef Paine said in
a video from local news affiliate, WPTZ.   What Paine was hinting at
is that eating animals injured or killed on the highways is somewhat of a
tradition in Vermont. According to Seven Days Vermont, the state's game
wardens keep lists of local residents who are more than happy to take
so-called "salvageable" road kill to stock their freezers. In 2014,
Vermont Fish & Wildlife documented 98 bears, 142 deer, and 58 moose killed
by vehicles, and wardens are glad to offload some of those animals to
residents who view the animals as just another source of meat to feed their
families. If the idea doesn't quite whet your appetite, you don't have
to eat it. "We're not going to force anyone to eat muskrat if they don't
feel like it, but it will be offered to everyone," said Paine, later adding,
"I'm sure 90 percent of Vermonters haven't tried beaver. But I'm sure they
would like it if they did. " Goose, deer, bear, moose, pheasant, and fish
pulled from Lake Champlain could also be on the menu, depending on what
Vermont Fish & Wildlife can gather. The game will be paired with local
and organic vegetables. A taste of the so-called pavement-to-plate cuisine
will cost diners $75, and Paine promises the meal will be delicious. The
proceeds from the dinner will benefit the conservation efforts of Vermont Fish
and Wildlife and Lake Champlain International. Up for challenging your
taste buds? Tickets available here.
It turns out that itsybitsy hole in the bottom of your airplane window is actually a very important
safety feature. It's all-too-easy to let your mind wander when you're
confined to a tiny box of space while hurtling 40,000 feet in the air at
hundreds of miles per hour, but rest assured: every single window on the
airplane has the same hole. More officially, it's called a breather hole and
it's used to regulate the amount of pressure that passes between the window's
inner and outer panes. In short, the system ensures that the outer pane bears
the most pressure so that if there were a situation that caused added strain
on the window, it's the outside panel that gives out (meaning you can still
breathe).   The breather hole also keeps the window fog-free by
wicking moisture that gets stuck between the panes. After all, half the fun
of an airplane ride is the in-flight scenery shots. Mystery solved. Erika
Owen is the Audience Engagement Editor at Travel + Leisure.  Follow
her on Twitter and Instagram at @erikaraeowen. Turns
out there's a very important safety reason for the holes in airplane
windows. Read about it here.
For the youth of America,
camp has an undeniable allure (the lack of parental supervision looming
large). But why spend your whole summer in one bunk when you can stay at four
hotels in California, three campsites in Montana and Utah, and a cruise ship
in Alaska? This is the lure of teen tours—the 4-to-6-week luxury trips
out West taken every summer by hundreds of kids around the country. While
nowhere nearly as popular as summer camps, these kinds of teen trips have been
around since the mid-1960s. Early teen-tour operators out of Long Island and
New Jersey first conceived of these trips as an alternative to sleep-away
camps, marketed toward kids who had a thirst for adventure but a distaste for
bunk life and athletic activity. American Trails West and Musiker Teen Tours,
the first two companies to offer these tours, sent out supervised groups of
three-dozen 14-year-olds on coach buses across the country, stopping at the
major national parks—from Yellowstone to Arches—and the major resort
destinations—from Las Vegas to Palm Springs.   More from Atlas
Obscura: Object of Intrigue: Martha, the Last Passenger Pigeon This was not
your family's rustic road trip. Equal in price to the most exclusive
sleep-away camps, the tours provided only the best amenities. The trips that
did offer camping stays showcased the "five-star" camping experience:
giant, 12-person tents filled with double-decker cots. With this set-up, no
camper would ever actually have to touch the ground. Accompanying the coach
bus with the kids was a food truck, driven and serviced by a cook who prepared
all the meals at the campsites.   Compared to today's cell
phone-connected world, these trips operated with a huge amount of freedom.
"They gave me a dozen maps of the West and $40,000 worth of Traveler's
Cheques that I carried in a back-pack my father carried in World War II,"
says Faith Baron, who guided tours in the 1970s with American Trails West.
"The bus rides were fun but endless. Whenever any of the kids asked us how
much longer until we got to the next place, we had the same answer: 1,000
miles. No one actually knew. Then we'd stop the bus at a highway stop and
buy them ice cream. It was all chaos and we had a blast," she says.
More from Atlas Obscura: Photos of Majestic Theaters Turned To Ruin Forty
years later, a small handful of teen-tour operators continue to run annual
summer trips out of the New York tri-state area. While Musiker Teen Tours has
re-invented itself as Summer Discovery, offering pre-college study abroad
programs instead of cross-country trips, originator American Trails West, and
a few other almost-as-old companies are still in the teen tour business.
They've expanded their offerings to now include month-long tours around
Europe and combination Alaska-Hawaii trips, but the formula remains the same:
take 40 kids to as many places as they can stand in 42 days.
Lake Tahoe, another tour offering for teens.
Lara Farhadi/Flickr Although variations on the teen tour arose
throughout the country in the 1980s and 1990s—shorter, less extravagant
trips run by religious and service-oriented organizations—the teen tour, in
its original, outsized and deluxe form has remained a tiny industry, with
fewer than six or seven operators running trips at a time. For this
reason, the story of the American teen tour is a well-kept secret limited to
only the circles of the lucky kids—like myself—who have experienced them.
Images and representations of sleep-away camp abound in the collective
imagination, a cultural lexicon that includes everything from Meatballs to
Salute Your Shorts to an entire genre of 80s slasher films. Where is the Wet
Hot American Summer of teen tours? It's a myth fifty years in the making,
waiting to be told. More from Atlas Obscura: Fleeting Wonders: Witness A
Rare Waterspout Off The Florida Coast Just as sleep-away camps don't seem
to change much over the years, neither do teen tour buses. Listening to Baron
recount her trips from the 1970s felt a lot like re-living my own summers as a
teen-tour traveler in the early 2000s. She described the same food trucks,
the same double-decker cots, the same amusement-park buddy system, the same
all-quiet-in-the-morning bus policy I remembered from my trips. On the open
road, few things change. The cast of characters, too, is nearly identical.
"We had the kids who wanted to shop and the kids who wanted to hike,"
Baron says. The same divide marked all three of my teen tours. With the
National Park Passport Book I made sure I had stamped at every park we
visited, I was one of the kids who wanted to hike.
Yellowstone National Park. Karthikc123
"On every trip I went on, we had to send at least one kid home," Baron
says. I remember vividly the delinquents from my own trips. On my first
trip, it was the boy who threw water balloons off a hotel balcony in Seattle.
On my second trip, it was the girl who got caught smoking something you
can't buy at a road-stop convenience store. Maybe the author of the 1988
guide, Summer Camps and Teen Tours: Everything Parents and Kids Should
Know,was onto something: "If your child has difficulty following
instructions, if he has a long history of spending his school days in the
principal's office, if you know that he has been abusing drugs, a teen tour
is not the place for him. " More from Atlas Obscura: Glorious Photos of
TWA Terminal from the Golden Age of Air Travel What would the Meatballs of
teen tours look like? Take all those uncomfortable, charming, weird
mid-adolescents of Wet Hot American Summer and put them on an air-conditioned
bus to a rodeo in Cody, Wyoming or a ski resort in Whistler. It's not so
much a camp experience as it as a family vacation with no one you're
actually related to. There are all the emotional milestones of sleep-away
camp—it's fun when you're there, sad when it's over, melancholy and
strange when you think about it years later—but there's something else,
too. It's that combination of wanderlust and boredom you can only find on a
teen tour bus. This article originally appeared on Atlas Obscura.
Did you enjoy this article? Share it.
For the youth of America, camp has an undeniable allure (the lack of parental
supervision looming large). But why spend your whole summer in one bunk when
you can stay at four hotels in California, three campsites in Montana and
Utah, and a cruise ship in Alaska? This is the lure of teen tours—the
4-to-6-week luxury trips out West taken every summer by hundreds of kids
around the country.
New York, Boston, and
Philadelphia all had their fair share of distilleries as far back as the
Colonial era. The rise of prohibition, however, meant the fall of many
urban distilleries. By the time the law was repealed most had been
dismantled and left to deteriorate. Recently, urban distilling has seen a
huge resurgence in both American and European cities alike, due to newly
supportive legislation, and a tidal wave of interest in craft spirits. Now
you can find distinctly Irish whiskey in the heart of Dublin, and
artisanal, flavored vodkas in the City of Light.  These popular
urban distilleries not only turn out some of the best spirits on the market,
but they also capture the character of the metropolises they call home.
Teeling Whiskey in Dublin, Ireland The last of Dublin's operating
distilleries shut down in 1976. In 2014, brothers Jack and Stephen Teeling
saw an opportunity to fill this gap and opened Teeling Whiskey, the first new
distillery in the city in 125 years. The Teeling family has a long history in
whiskey, and strives to both innovate, as well as pay homage to, the
Ireland's world-renowned whiskey reputation. "We are trying our best to
ensure we are adding to the cultural fabric of Dublin society," said Jack
Teeling, "[and] to capture the 'Spirit of Dublin' in how we go about
things. " To that end, Teeling often collaborates with local producers,
selling Irish whiskey-infused jams, ice cream, and BBQ sauce at the gift
shop, and creating menus and pairings for local restaurants. Visitors
can end their tour at the Bang Bang Bar for a signature cocktail or a dram of
any one of the various Teeling expressions. King's County Distillery
in Brooklyn, New York New York City was once home to many urban
distilleries. King's County's Colin Spoelman is something of an expert on the
subject.  In the early 2000s, New York State passed legislation making it
much easier for small distilleries to get up and running, and Spoelman and his
crew jumped at the chance. "Urban distilleries allow greater interactivity
between customer and distillers," he said. Given the amount of craftspeople
populating the borough, it wasn't hard for King's County to find like-minded
companies to collaborate with. Its chocolate whiskey features Mast Brothers
chocolate husks, and there's a limited-release honey moonshine made with
honeycombs from Brooklyn Grange Farm. The London Distillery Company
in London, England London is not exactly known as being a leader in
this whiskey-crazed world. But that may be set to change with the opening
of The London Distillery Company, the first whiskey producer to call the
city home in over a century. As of now, operations are still very much in the
experimental phase, but you can order test samples of a British rye and
"experimental gin" to chart how the company is doing as it crafts and tests
its spirits. NY Distilling Company in Brooklyn, New York Tom
Potter was no stranger to the alcohol business, having cofounded Brooklyn
Brewery in 1987. He retired in 2004 and, along with Allan Katz, started up NY
Distilling Company. The company, located in the trendy Williamsburg
neighborhood, offers a wide variety of spirits, including several types of
gin, a Rock & Rye, and a brand new, straight rye whiskey. Potter
recognizes that operating in an urban setting presents some challenges. "In a
rural setting [we] can have things spread out—but in the city everything
needs to be compact. " In true urban fashion, their Shanty bar sits just
adjacent to the production area, where visitors can sample the spirits in a
variety of cocktails. House Spirits in Portland, Oregon Portland,
Oregon is home to several urban distilleries, and the largest—not just in
the city, but in the entire state—is House Spirits, which has just opened a
new facility. "We are really proud of our downtown location, and believe that
our Portland culture and love for this city [has] helped shape our brand over
the course of the past decade," said founder Christian Krogstad. House
Spirits was conceived of as cocktail and distiller collaboration, and that
sensibility continues today. The team often works with local establishments
like Raven & Rose on cocktails and cask strength-versions of their
spirits, and they participated in this past year's Feast Portland food and
drinks festival. Visitors can sample and purchase Aviation American Gin,
Krogstad Festlig Aquavit, Westward Oregon Straight malt Whiskey and more at
the House Spirits Tasting Room. KOVAL in Chicago, Illinois 
Chicago is yet another city that, for many years, lacked any distilleries
(and thus any indigenous spirits). In 2008, this changed when KOVAL opened
its doors, producing single barrel, organic expressions of a variety of
spirits. "Chicago was a city built on manufacturing, but has since
transformed into a hub for technology, fashion, art, and hospitality," said
president Sonat Birnecker Hart. "By combining traditional distilling
methods with innovative technologies and thoughtful design practices, KOVAL
represents both Chicago's industrial history as well as the modern,
cosmopolitan metropolis that it is today. " In that spirit, KOVAL collaborated
on an event with DMK Burger Bar, featuring its new Dry Gin, and
visitors can sign up for numerous cocktail classes. Stranahan's Colorado
Whiskey in Denver, Colorado Master distiller Rob Dietrich believes
that operating in the city instead of the nearby mountains offers a wide array
of benefits. "In Denver, we have all of our resources readily available,"
said Dietrich. Still, Stranahan's faced some hurdles in getting up
and running. "It's always harder to be a pioneer than to be a settler. " he
added "Sometimes, you get to be both. "  Stranahan's is a truly
unique American whiskey with a mash bill that consists of 100 percent Rocky
Mountain barley—no corn, no rye, and no wheat. The result is extremely
malty and smooth-tasting.  Instead of an age statement, each bottle
lists what music was being listened to during the bottling process (The
Pixies, for example). Best of all, Stranahan's is an important part of
the community—they even have a 30,000-person  waiting list of
volunteers to help bottle the whiskey, and they work closely with
local bars and restaurants to collaborate on pairings and whiskey-based
dishes. After a tour, visitors can stop in at the  Whiskey
Lounge for cocktails like a Stranhattan or Rocky Mountain Cream Soda.
Distillerie de Paris in Paris, France Perhaps the newest of all urban
distilleries is Distillerie de Paris, which has been in operation for less
than a year. Right now, it offers a gin, flavored vodkas (think tea-flavored
mixtures with anise and citrus, or Indian-inspired blends with combawa and
exotic spices), rum, and a "gin style" brandy—flavored with jumiper, citrus,
and Cognac grapes.  More is certainly to come as the founders, Nicolas
and Sébastien Julhès Julhès continue to craft their distinctly French
take on a variety of spirits. American single-malt whiskey
in the heart of Philly, flavored vodkas from Paris: around the world, urban
distilleries are popping up. Read more for the best places to brew, and sip,
a city's spirit.
If you're going to learn
to play polo—the preferred sport of royals, billionaires, and oil scions
across the world—you may as well do it in style at the Estancia Vik José
Ignacio in Uruguay. The first polo match ever recorded was played way back
in 600 BC, when the Turkomans beat the Persians, and it's been going strong
every since. To help wannabe chukkers learn the difference between bits and
boots, Vik Retreats is now offering a package that combines some of the best
the luxury hotel has to offer (stunning rooms, South American architecture, an
extraordinary setting) with polo lessons.   On your first afternoon,
you'll learn the essentials of connecting stick to ball while riding a pony.
On the second day, a groom will show you how to prepare your pony to play
before saddling up and learning the ropes of the game. By day four of your
trip, you'll be ready to face off in friendly scrimmage matches. Drinks
will be served at the polo field after each match to toast your Nacho
Figueras–inspired victories—or to drown your sorrows. Plus, there's
no better place to recuperate from a staggering loss than sitting by the
spectacular pool, sitting in the stunning bathroom (really!), strolling
through the exquisite gardens, or studying the impressive art collection at
Estancia Vik. If that doesn't work, there's always the local wine.
Wanna-be polo players can learn the basics with this polo retreat
package from a luxury hotel in Uruguay.
Tourists in Paris (Photo: Thinkstock)By Kate Robinson1.
Fail to Say
"Bonjour."French politeness is predicated on the use of formulations.
You
don"t need to talk extensively (in fact, you shouldn"t unless you know the
person), but you must always say "Bonjour." When you walk into a tiny boutique
and you are only interested in looking; when you arrive at the office with a
hangover and no desire to speak to anyone; when you ask for directions on the
street; when you buy a bus ticket; and yes, when you walk into the waiting
room at the dentist"s office.
In fact, nearly every conversation should start
with "Bonjour" or "Salut, ça va?" if you don"t want to develop a
reputation for being antisocial and mal élevé.2.
Ask for ketchup or
ice."Did your mom ever get really irritated when you squirted ketchup all over
her homemade meatloaf? Imagine that, only ten times worse and that"s what
French people think of slathering good ol" Heinz 57 on everything from
saucisse de Toulouse to frites.
While the rise to celebrity status of the
American-style hamburger has somewhat attenuated this distrust of
transatlantic condiments, la moutarde remains a more culturally appropriate
choice.3.
Speak loudly in public places.France"s metropolitan centers are more
open and welcoming to international influence than ever.
But while the French
are happy to find foreign accents in their plates, they are not so enthused
about having to endure them at maximum volume while trying to enjoy a
tête à tête in a bistro.
Unless you"re in a small, crowded bar
where everyone is shouting across tables at one another, take it down a
notch.
If you need to talk to someone across the room, just get up and walk
over to them already.Related: Cheap and Chic Paris4.
Drink too much.Drunk in
Paris (Photo: Thinkstock)The French like to drink.
A lot.
Not just wine,
either.
They"re the world"s top consumers of whisky.
What they do not like to
do is binge drink.
You might encounter bottle after bottle at a party, but
more often than not, each pop of the cork is accompanied by a shared moment
following the collective "Santé!" when glasses twirl, lips smack, and
someone declares it plutôt fruité or plutôt sec.
Accidents
happen and there"s always that friend who has le vin aigre and ends up crying
in the bathroom, but these things take place with discretion and are not
flaunted as achievements.5.
Cut the cheese inappropriately.No, this is not
scatalogical humor.
There is a correct method to cutting each shape of
cheese.
For example, a tranche of Roquefort should be cut in wedges emanating
from the center of the thin edge, so what you get is essentially a core sample
of a round of cheese.
If you cut straight down the inside edge where the
creamiest, most pungent bit is, your French boyfriend will confiscate the
Opinel and reconsider your relationship.6.
Take the bait."T"es
américaine? T"as un flingue aussi?" Don"t fall for it.
Whether or not
your questioner has ever been to the United States or has any clue about
federal arms regulations, he doesn"t really care if you personally own a
gun.
When discussions veer into politico-religious-philosophical realms that
often get non-French blood boiling, remember le second degré, the irony
that underlies much of French humor.
Also, many French people simply enjoy the
debate — and teasing you.
After all, qui aime bien, châtie
bien.Related: How to See Paris in One Day7.
Order your steak "well
done."
Photo: ThinkstockIf you think French waiters are cold and unpleasant,
try asking for your steak à point.
It"s insulting on so many levels they
may ask you why you"re even bothering with the entrecôte.8.
Ask personal
questions.Being friendly and chatty in France can sometimes come across as
invasive.
Many Americans, for example, show interest in others by asking
complete strangers a slew of personal questions, in addition to sharing their
own life story, including details of their recent divorce and the neighbor"s
daughter"s drug problem.
Unless you"ve taken the time to develop meaningful
relationships with French people, don"t pry into their personal lives and
avoid over-sharing yours.
And whatever you do, don"t ask how much money they
make.9.
Leave the house in your pajamas.Wasn"t it cool how in college you
could walk around town in your sweats and flip-flops? Well, you"re not in
college anymore, you"re in France, where people tend to avoid inflicting their
unwashed hair, baggy pants, and yellow toenails on the rest of the world.
You
don"t have to wear Louboutins or slather yourself in makeup (in fact, that"s
another great way to embarrass yourself), just be respectful of others
— they have to look at you, too.10.
Eat in public.Sometimes you just
can"t avoid being late, and those baguettes poulet-crudités are so
practical for scarfing down while running to the metro.
That"s fine; just try
to finish before you actually get into the metro, unless you want to attract
sideways glares from your seat mate.
Eating is part of the personal sphere; if
you decide to chow down in certain public contexts, be prepared for
unsolicited attention."Quelle belle tarte": was that old man referring to you
or your tarte aux framboises?11.
Snack.It isn"t true that the French don"t
snack, they just don"t make a day-long habit of it.
The officially acceptable
snack times are 11 a.m.
and 4 p.m.
Diverge from the norm and depending on
where you work, be prepared to laugh off a few soi-disant jokes about your
gourmandise.More from Matador:10 Signs You"re Never Been to Seattle"6 Craft
Beers You Have to Try in Wisconsin30 Signs You Grew Up in BrooklynWATCH: How
to Eat French Food Like a French PersonLet World traveling club Travel inspire
you every day.
"Watch World traveling club Travel"s original series "A Broad Abroad."
Tourists in Paris (Photo: Thinkstock) By Kate Robinson 1.
Fail to Say
"Bonjour." French politeness is predicated on the use of formulations.
You
don't need to talk extensively (in fact, you shouldn't unless you know the
person), but you must always say "Bonjour.".10.
Eat in public.Sometimes
you just can"t avoid being late, and those baguettes poulet-crudités are
so practical for scarfing down while running to the metro.
That"s fine; just
try to finish before you actually get into the metro, unless you want to
attract sideways glares from your seat mate.
Eating is part of the personal
sphere; if you decide to chow down in certain public contexts, be prepared for
unsolicited attention."Quelle belle tarte": was that old man referring to you
or your tarte aux framboises?11.
Snack.It isn"t true that the French don"t
snack, they just don"t make a day-long habit of it.
The officially acceptable
snack times are 11 a.m.
and 4 p.m.
Diverge from the norm and depending on
where you work, be prepared to laugh off a few soi-disant jokes about your
gourmandise.More from Matador:10 Signs You"re Never Been to Seattle"6 Craft
Beers You Have to Try in Wisconsin30 Signs You Grew Up in BrooklynWATCH: How
to Eat French Food Like a French PersonLet World traveling club Travel inspire
you every day.
"Watch World traveling club Travel"s original series "A Broad Abroad."
Tourists in Paris (Photo: Thinkstock) By Kate Robinson 1.
Fail to Say
"Bonjour." French politeness is predicated on the use of formulations.
You
don't need to talk extensively (in fact, you shouldn't unless you know the
person), but you must always say "Bonjour."
The shrine to the British spirit opens in the
Tenderloin neighborhood. Over the last few years, San
Francisco has developed a bit of a crush on gin. A number of small batch
artisanal distilleries have opened around the Bay Area (most recently Falcon
Spirits Distillery in the Richmond, and Spirit Works Distillery in
Sebastopol). Juniper, too, has become a beloved addition on the latest craft
cocktail menus. It comes to a head this week, with the christening of
Whitechapel, a new bar devoted to gin. Inside, an obsession with the
British spirit runs deep—with more than 350 bottles on the list, it's
snagged the title for having the largest gin selection in North America. To
orient yourself amid this dizzying selection, start with the more manageable
cocktail menu. It's got an impressive 100 options on it (try the Dutch
Nemesis: Bols Genever, Combier Kummel, pineapple gum, sparkling wine,
angostura, and lime), and is designed to showcase the history of gin, curated
from vintage to contemporary selections. The bar has also collaborated with
San Francisco-based Distillery 209 on their house Whitechapel Victorian Dry
Gin, a traditional London-style gin with botanicals, black walnut, and lemon
verbena. The space itself is a veritable gin altar, broken into three
themed rooms. The design could be classified as Victorian San
Francisco-meets-London Underground, with beautiful moldings that nod to the
local architectural, barrel-vaulted ceilings, acanthus tiles, vintage
distilling paraphernalia serving as art pieces, and whimsical bubbly light
fixtures. The dining area pays tribute to London's ornate gin pubs of
the 1820s, and serves upscale bar bites to pair with gin's delicate profile.
Expect a blend of British, Dutch, and Bangladeshi flavors, noted in dishes
like mussels vindaloo, welsh rabbit, and quail with a scotched egg. Jenna
Scatena is on the San Francisco Bay Area beat for Travel + Leisure. Follow
her on Twitter and Instagram.   This week San Francisco
opens Whitechapel, a new bar in the Tenderloin that claims to have the largest
gin selection in North America. Read on for the details.
Does this goat look gassy? If so, maybe you don"t want it on your
plane.
(Photo: iStock)Well, this is one for the record books: flatulent goats
forced a cargo plane to make an emergency landing this week.
A"Singapore
Airlines Boeing 747-400 freighter plane traveling from Sydney to Kuala Lumpur
had 2,186 sheep on board, and the combined stench of their "exhaust fumes" and
manure set off the smoke alarm.The crew, thinking the alarm was due to, you
know, fire, quickly diverted to Bali and made an emergency landing.
Of course,
when emergency services boarded, they didn"t find any fire or smoke —
but they did find the natural emissions of 2,000 sheep.
Two and a half hours
later, the herd and the crew were on their way again."Related:"Airplane Noises
That Should (and Shouldn"t) Freak You OutThis isn"t the first time animals
have wreaked their own special brand of havoc on a Singapore Airlines
plane.
In August, another aircraft was carrying a flock of storks from
Istanbul to Singapore, and soon after takeoff, the birds pecked a hole in the
nose of the plane.Related: What Really Causes Plane Crashes? (It"s Not What
You Think)
In the case of the goats, the hoofers didn"t cause any
damage.
Apparently though, bloat and flatulence are common occurrences when
animals like cattle, sheep, and goats are under stress.
Now we"ve heard
everything.
Thank goodness we didn"t have to smell it.WATCH:"Behind the
Scenes: How an Emergency Airplane Evacuation WorksLet World traveling club
Travel inspire you every day.
Hang out with us on"Facebook, Twitter,
Instagram, and Pinterest."
Does this goat look gassy? If so, maybe you
don't want it on your plane.
(Photo: iStock) Well, this is one for the
record books: flatulent goats forced a cargo plane to make an emergency
landing this week.
A Singapore Airlines Boeing 747-400 freighter plane
traveling from Sydney to Kuala Lumpur had 2,186 sheep on board, and the
combined stench of their "exhaust fumes" and manure set off the smoke
alarm..Does this goat look gassy? If so, maybe you don't want it on your
plane.
(Photo: iStock) Well, this is one for the record books: flatulent goats
forced a cargo plane to make an emergency landing this week.
A Singapore
Airlines Boeing 747-400 freighter plane traveling from Sydney to Kuala Lumpur
had 2,186 sheep on board, and the combined stench of their "exhaust fumes"
and manure set off the smoke alarm.

NASA released a new video discussing their latest technology to track the ash cloud created from a volcanic eruption that could help the airline industry avoid grounding flights. Read on.
Travel Club. Powered by Blogger.

Popular Posts

Popular Posts

.