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How to get in—and what not to miss—at the world"s best new
airport lounges.
The Sprawling Stunner: VIP Lounge by LATAM
Photo: Latam
Airlines GroupWhere: Santiago"s SCL West Area, fourth and fifth floorsGetting
In: $50 for a day pass; free with a LATAM Premium Economy ticket, Oneworld
Premium Business ticket, or Oneworld Sapphire status.Design: The
23,000-squarefoot lounge is South America"s largest, featuring replicas of
indigenous stone artifacts and a copper-lined grand staircase.Food: The
international buffet includes sushi, cheese, and charcuterie platters, and
bottles of Chilean Carmenère.Perks: Dedicated rooms cover everything from
naps to video games (handheld PlayStation Vita devices included).Related: Love
to Lounge? Great Airport Lounges for Business TravelersThe Culinary Mecca:
Virgin Atlantic ClubhousePhoto: Tom SibleyWhere: Los Angeles"s LAX, T2Getting
In: Free for Virgin Atlantic fliers with an Upper Class ticket or Gold status
with Flying Club or Delta SkyMiles.Design: Midcentury Modern with a bit of
edge—bronze pendant lights, Arne Jacobsen Swan chairs, and a massive
black-and-white mural.Food: Small plates from of-themoment Century City
restaurant Hinoki & the Bird, along with blends from the Juicery (this is
L.A., after all).Perks: Cowshed products in the bathrooms; views of the
Hollywood Hills.The Zen Oasis: Centurion Lounge MiamiPhoto: Evan SungWhere:
Miami"s MIA, North Terminal, Concourse DGetting In: Free for top-tier American
Express cardholders; $50 with other Amex cards.Design: Bright and airy, with
floor-to-ceiling windows and a wall covered in live succulents.Food: Seasonal
comfort dishes, like fried chicken with watermelon salad, come courtesy of
local star chef Michelle Bernstein; the cocktail menu is by the legendary Jim
Meehan, of Manhattan"s PDT.Perks: The Exhale Spa offers 15-minute manicures; a
soundproof kids" room is a benefit for all travelers.The Design Star: Cathay
Pacific"s Pier First Class LoungePhoto: Carmen ChanWhere: Hong Kong"s HKG,
Northwest Concourse, Gate 63Getting In: Free with Oneworld Emerald status or a
first-class Oneworld ticket.Design: A horseshoe-shaped onyx bar and a library
filled with bronze workstations—all designed by Ilse
Crawford—lend a luxe pied-à-terre vibe.Food: A pantry stocks
grab-and-go snacks, and the dining room serves entrées like char siu bao
(barbecued-pork buns).Perks: Foot and neck massages can be had in eight day
suites; the 14 showers have Aesop bath products.The Service Wiz: SilverKris
Lounge by Singapore AirlinesPhoto: Singapore AirlinesWhere: London"s LHR,
T2Getting In: Free with a first- or business-class ticket, or Star Alliance
Gold status.Design: Interiors firm Ong & Ong is known for using natural
materials—here, they"ve paired batik and blond wood with dramatic
wingback chairs and modular work pods.Food: The menus have both Asian and
Western fare—try the Hainanese chicken rice and a Singapore
Sling.Perks: First-class passengers get butler service: welcome drinks, hot
towels, and more.More from Travel + Leisure:In Moscow, an Unexpected Creative
RevolutionThe Real Reason There"s a Tiny Hole in Airplane Windows18 Beautiful
Photos of Fall From Around the WorldWATCH: 4 Hacks to Help You Breeze Through
Airport Security"Let World traveling club Travel inspire you every day.
"Watch World traveling club Travel"s original series "A Broad Abroad." How to
get in—and what not to miss—at the world's best new airport lounges.
The
Sprawling Stunner: VIP Lounge by LATAM Photo: Latam Airlines Group Where:
Santiago's SCL West Area, fourth and fifth floors Getting In: $50 for a day
pass; free with a LATAM Premium Economy ticket, Oneworld Premium Business
ticket, or Oneworld Sapphire status.
Design: The 23,000-squarefoot lounge is
South America's largest, featuring replicas of indigenous stone artifacts
and a copper-lined grand staircase.
Food: The international buffet includes
sushi, cheese, and charcuterie platters, and bottles of Chilean
Carmenère..How to get in—and what not to miss—at the world's best new
airport lounges.
The Sprawling Stunner: VIP Lounge by LATAM Photo: Latam
Airlines Group Where: Santiago's SCL West Area, fourth and fifth floors
Getting In: $50 for a day pass; free with a LATAM Premium Economy ticket,
Oneworld Premium Business ticket, or Oneworld Sapphire status.
Design: The
23,000-squarefoot lounge is South America's largest, featuring replicas of
indigenous stone artifacts and a copper-lined grand staircase.
Food: The
international buffet includes sushi, cheese, and charcuterie platters, and
bottles of Chilean Carmenère.
Like many chefs, Doug
Paine of the Hotel Vermont is interested in local, sustainable cuisine. On November 7, the hotel will take that culinary mentality to the next level by hosting Wild About Vermont, a meal showcasing the state's finest fish and wild game.
 Local hunters and fisherman are donating their catches for the meal, and so is the Vermont Fish and Wildlife bureau, who will supply three animals who were injured or killed on the states roads. That's right: roadkill. "The idea is to get people connected to their local food
sources, but also to showcase the traditions of Vermont," Chef Paine said in
a video from local news affiliate, WPTZ.   What Paine was hinting at
is that eating animals injured or killed on the highways is somewhat of a
tradition in Vermont. According to Seven Days Vermont, the state's game
wardens keep lists of local residents who are more than happy to take
so-called "salvageable" road kill to stock their freezers. In 2014,
Vermont Fish & Wildlife documented 98 bears, 142 deer, and 58 moose killed
by vehicles, and wardens are glad to offload some of those animals to
residents who view the animals as just another source of meat to feed their
families. If the idea doesn't quite whet your appetite, you don't have
to eat it. "We're not going to force anyone to eat muskrat if they don't
feel like it, but it will be offered to everyone," said Paine, later adding,
"I'm sure 90 percent of Vermonters haven't tried beaver. But I'm sure they
would like it if they did. " Goose, deer, bear, moose, pheasant, and fish
pulled from Lake Champlain could also be on the menu, depending on what
Vermont Fish & Wildlife can gather. The game will be paired with local
and organic vegetables. A taste of the so-called pavement-to-plate cuisine
will cost diners $75, and Paine promises the meal will be delicious. The
proceeds from the dinner will benefit the conservation efforts of Vermont Fish
and Wildlife and Lake Champlain International. Up for challenging your
taste buds? Tickets available here.
It turns out that itsybitsy hole in the bottom of your airplane window is actually a very important
safety feature. It's all-too-easy to let your mind wander when you're
confined to a tiny box of space while hurtling 40,000 feet in the air at
hundreds of miles per hour, but rest assured: every single window on the
airplane has the same hole. More officially, it's called a breather hole and
it's used to regulate the amount of pressure that passes between the window's
inner and outer panes. In short, the system ensures that the outer pane bears
the most pressure so that if there were a situation that caused added strain
on the window, it's the outside panel that gives out (meaning you can still
breathe).   The breather hole also keeps the window fog-free by
wicking moisture that gets stuck between the panes. After all, half the fun
of an airplane ride is the in-flight scenery shots. Mystery solved. Erika
Owen is the Audience Engagement Editor at Travel + Leisure.  Follow
her on Twitter and Instagram at @erikaraeowen. Turns
out there's a very important safety reason for the holes in airplane
windows. Read about it here.
For the youth of America,
camp has an undeniable allure (the lack of parental supervision looming
large). But why spend your whole summer in one bunk when you can stay at four
hotels in California, three campsites in Montana and Utah, and a cruise ship
in Alaska? This is the lure of teen tours—the 4-to-6-week luxury trips
out West taken every summer by hundreds of kids around the country. While
nowhere nearly as popular as summer camps, these kinds of teen trips have been
around since the mid-1960s. Early teen-tour operators out of Long Island and
New Jersey first conceived of these trips as an alternative to sleep-away
camps, marketed toward kids who had a thirst for adventure but a distaste for
bunk life and athletic activity. American Trails West and Musiker Teen Tours,
the first two companies to offer these tours, sent out supervised groups of
three-dozen 14-year-olds on coach buses across the country, stopping at the
major national parks—from Yellowstone to Arches—and the major resort
destinations—from Las Vegas to Palm Springs.   More from Atlas
Obscura: Object of Intrigue: Martha, the Last Passenger Pigeon This was not
your family's rustic road trip. Equal in price to the most exclusive
sleep-away camps, the tours provided only the best amenities. The trips that
did offer camping stays showcased the "five-star" camping experience:
giant, 12-person tents filled with double-decker cots. With this set-up, no
camper would ever actually have to touch the ground. Accompanying the coach
bus with the kids was a food truck, driven and serviced by a cook who prepared
all the meals at the campsites.   Compared to today's cell
phone-connected world, these trips operated with a huge amount of freedom.
"They gave me a dozen maps of the West and $40,000 worth of Traveler's
Cheques that I carried in a back-pack my father carried in World War II,"
says Faith Baron, who guided tours in the 1970s with American Trails West.
"The bus rides were fun but endless. Whenever any of the kids asked us how
much longer until we got to the next place, we had the same answer: 1,000
miles. No one actually knew. Then we'd stop the bus at a highway stop and
buy them ice cream. It was all chaos and we had a blast," she says.
More from Atlas Obscura: Photos of Majestic Theaters Turned To Ruin Forty
years later, a small handful of teen-tour operators continue to run annual
summer trips out of the New York tri-state area. While Musiker Teen Tours has
re-invented itself as Summer Discovery, offering pre-college study abroad
programs instead of cross-country trips, originator American Trails West, and
a few other almost-as-old companies are still in the teen tour business.
They've expanded their offerings to now include month-long tours around
Europe and combination Alaska-Hawaii trips, but the formula remains the same:
take 40 kids to as many places as they can stand in 42 days.
Lake Tahoe, another tour offering for teens.
Lara Farhadi/Flickr Although variations on the teen tour arose
throughout the country in the 1980s and 1990s—shorter, less extravagant
trips run by religious and service-oriented organizations—the teen tour, in
its original, outsized and deluxe form has remained a tiny industry, with
fewer than six or seven operators running trips at a time. For this
reason, the story of the American teen tour is a well-kept secret limited to
only the circles of the lucky kids—like myself—who have experienced them.
Images and representations of sleep-away camp abound in the collective
imagination, a cultural lexicon that includes everything from Meatballs to
Salute Your Shorts to an entire genre of 80s slasher films. Where is the Wet
Hot American Summer of teen tours? It's a myth fifty years in the making,
waiting to be told. More from Atlas Obscura: Fleeting Wonders: Witness A
Rare Waterspout Off The Florida Coast Just as sleep-away camps don't seem
to change much over the years, neither do teen tour buses. Listening to Baron
recount her trips from the 1970s felt a lot like re-living my own summers as a
teen-tour traveler in the early 2000s. She described the same food trucks,
the same double-decker cots, the same amusement-park buddy system, the same
all-quiet-in-the-morning bus policy I remembered from my trips. On the open
road, few things change. The cast of characters, too, is nearly identical.
"We had the kids who wanted to shop and the kids who wanted to hike,"
Baron says. The same divide marked all three of my teen tours. With the
National Park Passport Book I made sure I had stamped at every park we
visited, I was one of the kids who wanted to hike.
Yellowstone National Park. Karthikc123
"On every trip I went on, we had to send at least one kid home," Baron
says. I remember vividly the delinquents from my own trips. On my first
trip, it was the boy who threw water balloons off a hotel balcony in Seattle.
On my second trip, it was the girl who got caught smoking something you
can't buy at a road-stop convenience store. Maybe the author of the 1988
guide, Summer Camps and Teen Tours: Everything Parents and Kids Should
Know,was onto something: "If your child has difficulty following
instructions, if he has a long history of spending his school days in the
principal's office, if you know that he has been abusing drugs, a teen tour
is not the place for him. " More from Atlas Obscura: Glorious Photos of
TWA Terminal from the Golden Age of Air Travel What would the Meatballs of
teen tours look like? Take all those uncomfortable, charming, weird
mid-adolescents of Wet Hot American Summer and put them on an air-conditioned
bus to a rodeo in Cody, Wyoming or a ski resort in Whistler. It's not so
much a camp experience as it as a family vacation with no one you're
actually related to. There are all the emotional milestones of sleep-away
camp—it's fun when you're there, sad when it's over, melancholy and
strange when you think about it years later—but there's something else,
too. It's that combination of wanderlust and boredom you can only find on a
teen tour bus. This article originally appeared on Atlas Obscura.
Did you enjoy this article? Share it.
For the youth of America, camp has an undeniable allure (the lack of parental
supervision looming large). But why spend your whole summer in one bunk when
you can stay at four hotels in California, three campsites in Montana and
Utah, and a cruise ship in Alaska? This is the lure of teen tours—the
4-to-6-week luxury trips out West taken every summer by hundreds of kids
around the country.
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